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20121201
20121231
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. it was edward cooley green over six-foot tall and 200 pounds and a self-made millionaire he asked hetty to mary ann and her father agreed on one condition. that edward signed a prenuptial that they would live off of edwards monday and hetty money was hers to protect and increase and pass on to the next generation. shortly after that her father died and left her $1 million. the $5 million estate, in 1865, was plucked in a trust. that hurt her deeply. she wanted to control her own money. then her aunt died. and then she would leave all of the many of $2 million to hetty behalf was left to the town of new bedford and the other half to hetty and it was plucked in trust. she was furious so she sued. the lawsuit went on for years and was a landmark case and hetty was litigious for life. surely after her and edward married and went to london and sold american railroad bond during the days of the boom and he sold them to european investors. hetty gave birth to two children. a son and daughter and she invested her money in the real road bond and the greenback. and boasted in one day she made $200,000 eu
, is distinguished fellow and conservative thought, the be simon center for principals and politics. dr. edwards has enjoyed a career as one of the leading historian of american conservatism. his works range from biographies of president reagan to a recent biography of william f. buckley. dr. edwards is founding director of the institute of political journalism at georgetown and was a fellow at the institute of politics at jfk school of government at harvard. john lewis gaddis next to me is one of the leading historians of the cold war. he won the pulitzer prize for his biography of the diplomats george f. cats. john lewis gaddis's work as robert lovett prof. of history and influenced the work of cold war historians all over the world. played a major role on uncovering the role of leadership personalities, the influence of his work can be seen in the 24 part cnn television series cold war. a graduate of universal -- yale university, class of, can you help me, i was missing that detail. mr. evans, his book blacklisted by history the untold story of senator joe mccarthy and his fight against america's
. [laughter] i didn't ask them to ask this question. >> his name is lee -- >> lee edwards. >> lee edwards. >> that's right. >> who is also a biographer, as you are. >> and he's a historian. he's written several histories of the conservative movement. he himself has been a member of the conservative movement, an important person in that. >> jealousy? >> no, it's not jealousy, i can do that. but one thing about mr. edwards being asked to write that review, is that one of the things he takes issue with is i call him from his ghost writer because -- it was thurmond's staffer, former staffer of thurmond who has characterized his work on the book as being ghost writing. i talked to them and after talking to him, i e-mailed mr. edwards and i asked him if i could interview him about his relationship with traffic and what work he did in that kind of thing. and he said it was 40 years ago, yeah, as any entity would be a waste of your time and mine. so my own thing i can do, he was brave enough to read a criticism after the book when it got right. he got a number of things wrong. he quoted goldwater
youngest child prince edward. she has opinions which she will express and private, but extremely careful to not make political statements in public. i was told about one that was amusing that robert title one of the american ambassador's during george of the bush came for the presentation of his credentials and then there was the congestion tax that was a political hot potato and being imposed to keep them from driving into london the american embassy maintained there were not liable to pay because they said it was a charge but they call it the tax. robert tuttle arrived for his credentials they went through the formalities then the informal discussion and she said, and stand you think the congestion charge is the tax? she said it is and she said of course, it is. the diplomatic corps turned white at the prospect but that is very unusual. with her relationship with american presidents, she bonded with them on a personal basis but nothing to do with politics. >>host: with several instances you indicated she has a wicked sense of humor. >>guest: she does. she spends a lot of time in scotla
this cost $142 billion. fannie and freddie were under the thumb of their regulator, edward demarco, a no-nonsense fellow who promise to shrink gradually and reduce the independence of the housing market gradually. meanwhile we are still relying on fannie and freddie to provide funding for most mortgages. annie, freddie and the f h a have accounted for 90% of u.s. home loans. eventually congress will make a fundamental decision about what kind of mortgage market we will have. it will go back to trusting the free market or have some kind of government mechanism in place to insure that home mortgages can always be affordable? i submit that the historical record of the past 70 years suggests when a comes to housing congress will have a hard time trusting the market. thank you. [applause] >> great comments. this brings us to our discussions of whom the first will be tom who has been in the mortgage research business for 35 years, a longstanding critic of government sponsored enterprise and has great perspective on the fateful history which bob has so well chronicled. he held with morgan guara
. the letter to edward conway started on he wants to bring in german immigrants to be in ventured servants, and incur -- intermingle with the slaves. he said their children will be free. i don't interpret that as him kind of being racist saying slaves can become citizens but in ventured servants can. are you suggesting that he was imagining them to intermingling intermarriage and that he -- >> no. no. go ahead. spent the letter pretty clearly refers to the german children that he's talking about -- >> there's a follow-up -- >> i've read -- i know in 1798 short makes almost the same proposal and short explicitly calls for interracial marriage and interracial children. he embraced it spent totally different circumstances. >> it's the same type of proposal. he was talking about german immigrants. the same type of thing, but i mean in jefferson's letter, i mean, i've written about it. i'd be happy to show you the letters. in this letter, he's talking about the children, the germans. >> no. now, he's talking about the children's be dished i have a letter spent that's what he told thomas paine b
are here tonight with a national book award winners mary anne hoberman, james carroll, edward ball am victor nebraska, jean valentine, as was a net cord and, robert caro, both of whom are winners of the pulitzer prize. also winners of the pulitzer prize, katherine boo and applebaum, amanda foreman, national book critics circle winner laura and robert. and, finally, dave eggers. and stephen king, recipient of the national book foundation's medal for distinguished contributions to american letters. please join me in recognizing these great american writers. [applause] i would like to thank our financial supporters without him we could not bring you the awards, or our programs. again, i will ask you to hold your applause until i read the list. premier sponsors, barnes & noble, thanks guys, random house, the ford foundation, leadership sponsors, clinton meyer book publishing papers, a division of central national, coral graphics, penguin, and sponsors amazon, google, harper collins, stephen king, and deborah wiley, thank you. [applause] now for something special. i'd like to acknowledge i
a lot of anti-president obama books like edwards kline "the amateur," "the great destroyer" "i am the change," and "obama's america," critical of president obama. do these books sell well? >> guest: they do sell well because they are rightly or wrongly a counter point. readers wish to buy that that, and as a result, these books have an an active audience. now that he's re-elected, i'm serve publishers who are conservatively inclined will continue to produce books that sell well because they will continue to appeal to an audience that demands these books. >> host: now, bob, have you interviewed any of the critical authors? >> guest: no -- well, let's see, glenn beck, but he's not recently taken on exactly president obama. sort of interesting. i think this is generally true, who whoever -- whoever is in the power in the white house, the opposite political slant on books does better. when a liberal democrat is in the white house, conservatives tend to do belter. when there's a conservative in the white house like bush, books critical of the president tend to do better. in fact, i rem
' day, february 8 team. the >> president john f. kennedy and senators robert f. kennedy and edward kennedy. the author examines joseph kennedy's careers in business and politics, which included ventures on wall street, hollywood and the founding chairman of the securities and exchange commission. this is a little under an hour. >> thank you all. as i tell my history students -- [inaudible] as i tell my histories of it until i went to choke me, the past is a foreign country. we can visit there, try to learn the customs, translate the language, feel the air, the fragrance, but where foreigners in a strange way. this is true as much of the recent past as it is of colonial america. writing about the recent past is not easy to tailor this time around. first, there were people got to talk to. i was blessed from beginning to end by having fascinating views. i much prefer working for but documents than listening to people, tried to figure out what's real, what's imagined, what they know, what they think they know because someone told them what they think they know, but they don't know at a
ds, put out a lot of anti president obama books including edward klein's "the amateur," david limbaugh's "the great destroyer," charles kessler's i am the change, obama's america, quite critical of president obama. do these books sell well? >> they do largely because they serve rightly or wrongly as a counterpoint. many readers wish to buy into at and as a result of these books have a very active audience and president obama has been reelected, i am sure these publishers with conservative inference or conservatively inclined will predict to sell well and they will continue to appeal to an audience that demand these books. >> have you interviewed these critical of others? >> no. let's see. glen beck, but he is not recently taken on exactly president obama. sort of interesting. this is generally true, whoever's in power in the white house, the opposite political slant does better. liberal democrat in the white house, when there's a conservative in the white house, president bush, critical of the president and do better. it was being questioned about jobs or something and he said
concerned. last time we had good candidates just in general with john edwards with it is called yes i know he is the millworkers son but there is hollywood and the hair. sarah palin. i wrote her version of the barbra streisand classic on the cleared day icy-- i can see russia. and talked-about candidates and seems impossible but the then governor of illinois was mentioned rob flood of which -- the ugly of block a and hit seem to to hem a powerful appointment to which the appointment should make you rich but the plant turned out to have a glitch perhaps the fed said flipped a switch and so much for rob blob of which. in 2012 was a little concerned wonder two candidates were left over to your fans including romney when i did a poem about him yes, he is so slick of speech and garb he reminds us of ken of ken and barbie. quick to shed his regalia he may be lacking genitalia. [laughter] one but we had good candidates for car was concerned there was only one primary in 2008 i had to. we had people like rick perry like john edwards has beautiful hair. and a good time because they say the neath th
edward klein joined booktv at freedom fest to talk about his new york times best selling book "the amateur". he looks critically at president obama before and after he reached the white house. here is what he had to say. >> the book currently on your screen has spent several weeks on the new york times best-seller list, many weeks at number one. "the amateur" has been written by edward klein who is our guest, booktv on c-span2. where did you get a title for this book? >> guest: it came from a meeting bill clinton had in chapel:00, new york, north of new york city where he has a home. this was back in august of 2011. his wife, his daughter and a bunch of friends to meet with him because he had news. he had done a secret poll in 2011 and polls showed if hillary clinton would challenge barack obama for the democratic presidential nomination in 2012, he thought she could win. she was surprised by all this. she said what can i do? secretary of state, i have lunch with the man every thursday. what about loyalty? he said there is no such word as loyalty in politics. he went on to say the
've known edward since he came into the house in 2008, and this is a man who is passionate about yth, about engagement, about the interests of children and young people. it's writteno is dna, not just as a politic but as a human being. his whole family have got a track record on issues of caring, on fostering, helping very e very disadvantaged young people, and i was personally thrilled to bit ford edward when he got the job as children's minister. it really is an absolutely obvious fit. so, colleagues, members of the youth parliament, from wherever you come, whenever your political views, whether you have a party affiliation or not, whatever it is, please give a youth parliament welcome to edward. [cheers and applause] >> well, mr. speaker, thank you very much for that very warm welcome. and i suppose it's really to follow that. there have been a recount, so i think we need to move on and think about what this debate has achieved for everybody here, including myself, and my other colleagues who have taken the opportunity to hear and listen to much of the fantastic and excellent words that
've known edward since he came into the house in 2008, and this is a man who is passionate about youth, about engagement, about the interests of children and young people. it's written into this dna, not just as a politic but as a human being. his whole family have got a track record on issues of caring, on fostering, helping very e very disadvantaged young people, and i was personally thrilled to bit ford edward when he got the job as children's minister. it really is an absolutely obvious fit. so, colleagues, members of the youth parliament, from wherever you come, whenever your political views, whether you have a party affiliation or not, whatever it is, please give a youth parliament welcome to edward. [cheers and applause] >> well, mr. speaker, thank you very much for that very warm welcome. and i suppose it's really to follow that. there have been a recount, so i think we need to move on and think about what this debate has achieved for everybody here, including myself, and my other colleagues who have taken the opportunity to hear and listen to much of the fantastic and excellen
written by edward cline, who is our guest on booktv on c-span2. where did you get the title for this book. >> it came from a meeting that bill clinton had in chappaqua new york, north of york city where he has a home. this is back in august 2001. he invited several gas and it showed that he wanted to challenge the president and she is surprised by all this. and she said though, how can i do this, and the secretary of state. i have the ones with the miniver thursday. what about loyalty? and he said, there is no such word as loyalty in politics. he then went on to say that the people. the aaa credit rating of the united states, the barack obama was, in his words, an amateur. i spoke to people at that meeting. when i heard that, i said, that's the perfect title for this book, "the amateur." >> president clinton has denied publicly that he has used that term. >> i will tell you an interesting story. he has denied it, but hillary has told his friends that she suspected that of all people, chelsea had told me about this. now, that's not true. i've never met chelsea clinton. but apparently she h
were taken by the photographer, edward steichen, in 1903. he was just starting out as a photographer and morgan was sitting for a portrait--having his portrait painted. and he hated to sit still for very long, so alfred stieglitz, who was a very famous photographer, decided that morgan should have a photo--the painter should have a photograph to work from, and hired edward steichen, who was just starting out in his career, to do it. steichen came in--he actually posed a janitor in the shot while he set it up to get it ready for morgan. morgan blew in, sat down very quickly, took the pose that he always took for the portrait painter, and steichen made the quick exposure and took that shot. however, he didn't really like the pose. he thought it was too formal, too self-conscious, and he asked morgan to rearrange himself a little bit, to move his head slightly to one side and get in a more comfortable position. morgan was not pleased to be told to rearrange himself a little bit, so he bristled a bit. and steichen immediately saw that this was the morgan--he saw these sort of piercing ey
. kennedy and senators robert f. kennedy and edward kennedy. the author examines joseph kennedy's career in business and politics, which included ventures in wall street, hollywood and the founding chairman of the securities and exchange commission. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you, all. delighted to be here. as i tell my history students at the city university of new york in the ph.d. program -- thank you. [laughter] as i tell my history students until they want to choke me the past is a foreign country. we can visit, try to learn the customs and the white smith the fragrances, recoil at the foul odors but we are foreigners in a strange land. this is true as much in the recent past as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy as it is this time around. first there are people you have to talk to. and while i was blessed from beginning to end by having some fascinating people to talk to about joe kennedy including large numbers of committees, i much prefer working from written documents to listening to people talk an
to submit those. >> we'll leave the record open for ten days, so ordered ms. edwards? >> i'm going to yield some of my time to -- >> oh, i'm sorry. >> with that, mr. chairman, i'll yield the rest of my time to mr. denham. >> ideas, and then -- you're recognized, and then we'll go to ms. edwards. >> has the administration taken the position to waive nepa? >> not that i know of. >> have you had decision of it? >> i've had no discussion about it. >> have you had discussions with the governor in the way of sequa? >> no, sir. >> so when the federal government wants to avoid some of the lawsuits, get something done on time, certainly from a state perspective a governor who has decided to waif -- waive nepa to get at&t park done or build a football stadium, i would think that the two parties wanting to get high-speed rail as the number one priority would look at rather than having duplicative regulation and going through nepa that we would try to streamline it at some point so that this 98 flubbing waiting to $68 billion can actually get narrowed down to a specific. do you have any thoughts or com
influence in pluto accurates. in "the social conquest of earth," biologist edward o. wilson argues that group selection is the reason for human evolution. steve cole, president of the new america foundation, investigates the power and global influence of exxonmobil in "private empire: exxonmobil and american power." for an extended list of ligs to 2012 notable book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> booktv continues now with diana furchtgott-roth. she takes a look at president obama's green jobs initiative and argues that it hurts the economy. this is about 40 minutes. >> good afternoon. i'm howard, vice president for policy research at the manhattan institute. thanks so much for joining us. the question of of whether and how government, particularly the federal government, directs tax dollars to specific industries was a discussion in last night's presidential debate, and can it's become an important and ongoing theme in the current presidential campaign. the terms on which washington assisted the finance and auto industri
to ireland, jean kennedy smith, who was essential enraging piece. and senator edward kennedy, the longest-serving senator at his death in the united states senate. the story of joseph kennedy is the story of the man who spent his life moving back and forth from outsider to insider and back into outsider insider. story of an irish catholic who is not ashamed of his irish heritage, but refused to be defined by it. he was a third generation immigrant. his parents had been born in the united states. his grand parents had come here when they were young people. joseph kennedy cared little about the countries whose grandparents had been born in. he had no desire to visit ireland or read about it. he was 100% american. and he couldn't quite understand why anyone would think of him as less than 100% american. his anger was the catholic church growing up. being irish catholic in boston, he needed an anchor. he was born in east boston is kind of local royalty. everyone knew his mother's family and his father's family and his father was a well-known prominent awesome politician and very well respecte
and edward auto of ghana and president felix coetzee -- of the ivory coast and i just murdered their names for which i apologize. it included the sms or liberia samuel z westerfield as well as a reverent billy graham. and mrs. john h. johnson, the wife of the president of the johnson publishing company that published ebony and jet. in addition to speeches before political parties the africans treated past and her entourage to a whirlwind of dinners receptions and presentations. patzek or responsibilities seriously. julie noted in for her biography of her mother that pat snuck away from the family of two goodies to go over her written notes and organize her thoughts for the upcoming trip. the state department staff repaired remarks for her she went over them making changes where she felt necessary and highlighting point she wanted to emphasize. in liberia sheen -- by noticing how i'm -- noting noting our press she was by the considerable development that occurred since your last visit in 1957. in ghana she traveled out of the hills to pay her respects to 83-year-old chief who she met du
to venture out. he had this insatiable appetite for running. he studied david hume, the six volumes of edward gibbons decline and fall of the roman empire. adam smith's two volume work on the wealth of nations, the great economic work. he kept studying latin and read cicero. he read english poets. he had this insatiable appetite for learning. a 69 was still studying on goal wrigley. i went to jail instead of harvard. of course a big difference. >> but i take it as a politician especially in our modern sense of the word he may have lacked a certain common touch. >> he had no common touch but very few of the leaders in the country did at that time. they were all university graduates except for george washington, and george washington educated himself. he read more than 6,000 books. this was an elite. the constitution didn't give liberty of the ordinary man. turned over but it gave congress the same life the parliament had and they could tax us without our permission. it gave the constitution did not provide liberty for the american people. if the government into the hands of the property elite,
volumes of edward gibbons, decline and fall of the roman empire. adam smith's two volume work on the wealth of nations, great economic word. he kept studying latin. he read the latin poets in cicero and avenue. he read the english poet. he had this insatiable appetite for learning. at 16 i was still studying uncle wiggly. but i read it in latin because i went to heal instead of harvard. >> i take it as a politician in our modern sense of the word female black the common touch. >> very few of the leaders of this country did at the time. they were all university graduates except for george washington and george washington was an autodidact commotion so fed 6000 books. this was an elite. constitution did not give liberty to the ordinary man. all it did was replace the king with the president. but it gave congress the same right. congress could tax. the constitution did not provide liberty for the american people. if the government into the hands of a property elite and was a white male that ran this country for the first year of our nation. >> house on to put it to slavery come f
of the regulator, edward demarco, a no-nonsense fellow, and he promised to shrink them gradually and to reduce the independence of the housing market on them gradually. but meanwhile, we are still relying on fannie and freddie to provide funding for most home mortgages. fannie and freddie and fha in recent years have accounted for around 90% of new u.s. homeland. eventually congress will have to make have to make fundamental decisions about what kind of mortgage market will we have. should we go back to trusting the free market, or shall we have some kind of government mechanism in place to ensure that to mortgages can always be a portable? i submit that the historical record of the past 70 years suggest that when it comes to housing, congress will have a hard time trusting the market. thank you. [applause] >> great comments. this brings us to our discussants. the first will be tom who has been in the mortgage research business for a mere 35 years. a long-standing critic in government sponsored enterprises and has great perspective on the fateful history which bob is so well chronicled. tom wa
of all three of them. and, of course, marvin kalb, who is the edward r. murrow professor emeritus at the harvard school of government and to contribute news analyst for npr and fox news channel, and is frequently called upon to comment on major issues of the day by many other leading organizations, and also he is very dear to her heart here at afsa. history to serve as moderator and has done a superb job every time. very happy to have you back, marvin. thank you so much. let me just go back and say just a word about the in depth knowledge, the skill, the dedication and perseverance of each of you present today, who worked on the negotiating team for the process that led up to it. really did not just bring this to tuition -- fruition. it required outstanding diplomacy and capacity to balance the risks and demand of piece and the sort of okay security environment of the cold war period, which perhaps most people to remember, but perhaps some do not. so before turning the program over to marvin though, i would just like to mention, we have a new book that is very pertinent to the sub
to misbehavior in high office. there's a long history of it and arnold schwarzenegger and john edwards, david petraeus had nothing on alexander hamilton. if you read for example letters written by martha washington going to the winter camp, she didn't complain about the weather. she didn't complain about the harsh conditions but she did complain about one thing. there was a was a tomcat one winter that was misbehaving and it was noisy and kept her awake at night so she nicknamed the tomcat alexander hamilton. because of all the young girls will come into the camp. i also did a book a few years ago called life in the white house about the presidents and these. what hobbies do they have? what were their fears and hopes and what did they -- or were they like his fathers and husbands as another way of stressing presidential characters providing us with another lens. we are all still trying to figure out -- and for example nixon in his free time like to bowl alone and sometimes wore a black suit to do it. that begins to explain things, right everyone? who does this? so i guess all books and up to
appreciations of professor bickel who we've talked about and edward levy. >> guest: yeah, ed levy was the first professor i had in law school, and then he became dean of the law school, then he became provost and president of the university, and he became attorney general when i was solicitor general. so he was my first professor and my last attorney general. but i'll never forget the most vivid recollection i have of him is we came into class the first day and sat down, and he was looking at us waggling a big cigar and waggling his eyebrows, which he did. and finally, silence for a long time. and finally he said i'm not going to keep you long today. i'm not going to keep you long because i haven't got anything to say to you. i haven't got anything to say to you because you're too eager to talk to, and that made an impression on me. >> host: wow. judge bork, thank you so much. >> guest: well, i enjoyed chatting with you, gene. >> host: thank you. >> that was "after words," booktv's signature program in which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists, public policymak
's answers left everyone shocked and unnerved. afterwards, attorney general edward bates setup into the night filling page after page of his diary. quote, the secretary of war and the president are kept in ignorance of the actual condition of the army and its intended movements bates confided. the blame he concluded lay with abraham lincoln. an excellent man wrote bates and in the main wise but he lacks will and purpose and i greatly fear he has not the power to command. over the next 12 months, the civil war became a cataclysm. the federal government became a -- in the confederacy came close to winning its independence. get set for the key losses that led to its doom. 186200 the death knell of slavery and the military leaders who would eventually win the war. like grant, sherman, sheridan, meredith. the future of the nation was set that year in indelible inc.. a blueprint for an america of continental red, network transportation, widespread education and industrial might. at the same time these 12 terrible months revealed the dreadful cost of entry into that future. payable in blood and mise
three of them. of course, marvin, who is the edward r murrow professor at harvard kennedy school of government, and contributing news analysts for npr and fox news channel. he's frequently called upon to comment on major issues of the day by many other leading news organizations. and also he's very dear to our heart here because he's frequently served as moderator and done a great job every time. we're happy to have you back thank you so much. let me just go back and say a word about the in-depth knowledge, the skill, the dedication and the perseverance of each of you present today. who worked on the negotiated teams or the process that lead up to it. really did not just bring this treaty to fruition but also reflect the practice of diplomacy at its best. it required, you know, outstanding diplomacy and -- to plan the risk and demands of peace in the opaque security environment of the cold war period, which perhaps most people here remember perhaps some do not. [laughter] so before turning the program over to marvin, though, i would like to mention that we have a new book that is
at the department of education, the children's minister edward. edward, andrew, angela, it's a delight to have you. before we hear from andrew and angela, i call in order to read a message from the prime minister, from yorkshire. [applause] member of the parliament, i'm -- [inaudible] we are -- this is your opportunity to debate -- by more than [inaudible] 260,000 people. -- [inaudible] include -- [inaudible] the children and the people. he has -- [inaudible] to listen to your -- [inaudible] and translate your views to the hard work of government. your meeting today will be young people ato -- the opportunity to debate issues that -- [inaudible] it's a big thing. i wish you the latest -- [inaudible] i look forward to hearing your debates. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for reading that. that is a delight to have the prime minister's support. i now call to say some words to us, the leader of the house of commons. mr. andrew. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. [applause] thank you, mr. speaker. members of the you'll parking lotment, i'm debated to -- that righted to welcome you for the fourth
for being on booktv. >> from the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel featuring author edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wow, that's bob oakes? [laughter] i thought he was taller -- [laughter] i thought he was thinner, i thought he had more hair. [laughter] and, you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. [laughter] let me thank all of you for coming here this afternoon and thank the boston book festival for having us. don't they do a nice job? isn't this a terrific eventsome. >> yes. [applause] >> let's also thank the plymouth rock foundation for sponsoring this particular session and say that without their generosity, it would be hard to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city. so so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about thi
until i'm done. let me run through a few people. maryann hobberman, james carol, edward, victor, lily, jean valentine, robert cairo, and are also winners of the pulitzer prize. juneau diaz, katherine, and tracy smith, amanda foreman. national book critic circle wins nora and robert and dave eagers recipient of the literary award and stephen king. please join me in recognizing these great american writers. [applause] i would like to our financial supporters. without whom woe couldn't bring you awards the or programs. i would like you to hold your applause until i've read the list. premier sponsors barnes & noble, ban skies, random house, the ford foundation, leadership sponsors. harper colins, stephen king, debra buy lee, thank you. [applause] [applause] okay, now for something special. i'd like to acknowledge in the audience the winner of the fourth annual innovation in reading prize. funded by the lessening gear foundation. listen to the list and hold your applause until i'm finished. we have 15-year-old lily. she started givingly briers in a homeless shelter where kids can take as m
capacity to keep america's economy moving as well. >> thank you. i yield to ms. edwards. >> thank you, mr. chairman, and thank you to our witnesses and also for your patience. as you can tell there's a lot of interest on this committee, even on an off day around high-speed rail. so thank you very much. secretary, some on this committee criticized the administration for higher speed rail. i wonder if you can tell us about some of the improvement writers would see as a result of investments that are investing in high-speed rail and not just high-speed rail, and why that would be important? >> well, as an engine in washington state since 1994, we have been working on an incremental approach to growing passenger rail service in our state. as we have additional round trips, additional speeds and additional reliability of service, we are fund our ridership growing year over year. when you think about the unique characteristics of different states, for us in oregon, the specific testing pacific northwest and the ipod quarter, the northwest corridor for us is linking between some pretty rural are
. i think both of you. ms. edwards. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to thank all of our witnesses today and particularly thank secretary lahood. i understand it's your birthday. i don't think i would've chosen to spend my birthday with you, but i'm glad you've chosen to spend your birthday with us. particularly to the chairman for holding this hearing and discussion today about high-speed rail. we had a chance to begin a half ago to go up to new york and less amtrak, but it just took forever. i do share your view and that of ms. norton that we have a really densely populated corridor in the north east that requires her best development of high-speed rail. i don't think that has to be, nor should it be at the exclusion of development of high-speed rail and other quarters of the country. when i think about a trip that i took many years ago with my son from paris to the dirt on your region in france going from a densely populated urban area to a rural and mountainous region and high-speed railways and excluded the mayor. so i think the same can be true of areas around the central coa
the opposite effect. nobel economist edward press scott of arizona has found that higher marginal tax rates are the reason europeans work one-third fewer hours than americans. when marginal rates are lower, prosperity flows to other sectors of society, allowing business to create jobs and new products, compete for workers to raise wages and i vest their profits, which can then be lent to other entrepreneurs. everyone gains in a free economy. as john f. kennedy put it, a rising tide lifts all boats. look at what free enpricent pris achieved? millions of new private-sector jobs were created and the stock market soared tripling in value over eight years. the lower tax rates and reduced regulatory burden produce add more robust economy and a more robust economy meant more revenue for government. similar resulted attended the tax rate reductions during the presidency of george w. bush. many policy-makers have forgotten these lessons. in 2008, america's score in the index of economic freedom has declined significantly -- i mean, since 2008, to the point where we are no longer considered a free ec
's followed by edward kline who wrote the "amateur" about the president's life and career before reaching the white house. and later, the white house videographer for the first two years of the obama presidency. >> so this is always puts the missiles in cuba. the united states discovers that with our flight, our surveillance flights over there. then the tension builds and we have quarantine of blockade around cuba. one of the things that happens during the time the soviet submarine is found by american ships, and they start to drop missile charge, death charges on the soviet submarine. they knocked out the electrical system. carbon dioxide rising. people passes outside in the submarine. they have no communication. the commander of the submarine says load the or it torpedoes. let's attack. the war probably started already. we're not going to do summer salts down here. we're not going disgrace our country. they launch a nuclear torpedo. they set it to launch. fortunately one of the other commanders on the ship with a lower rank talked him out of him. he might have safe the world. it's close
as an important person. and that is edward meese. he was first an adviser and attorney general. he said there has been a liberal agenda. above all, roe versus wade banned abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution. there was a lawyer who wanted work on behalf of that agenda. john roberts and samuel alito. 1985 in a memo. justice alito wrote what can be made of this opportunity to advance and bring about the eventual overruling of roe versus wade. later that year, apply for a promotion he wrote i'm particularly proud of my contribution. .. so reagan's people went all the way to the intermediate appeals court in arizona. not even the arizona supreme court to find a remarkable figure who buys and a sandra day o'connor. sandra day o'connor is not a social conservative for a religious conservative or anything like the kind of conservatives that dominate the republican party now and that was fine with ronald reagan. he didn't care. it wasn't his agenda either and he's very proud of this nomination of o'connor. 1996, chief justice burger stepped down. reagan elevated rehnquist as chief justice, named
david more and less on his biography of barack obama followed by more on president obama with edward kline who wrote the amateur about the president's life and career before the white house. later, the white house videographer for the first two years of the obama presidency. >> so we put the missiles in cuba, the united states discovers that with our surveillance flights over there and tension builds and we have a quarantine or blockade around cuba and one thing that happened in that time is a soviet submarine is found by american ships and they start to drop missile charges, depth charges on soviet submarines, knocked out the electrical system, carbon dioxide was rising. people were passing out inside the submarine. they had no communication with the kremlin. the commander of the submarine says load the torpedo, let's attack, the war probably started already, we are not going to be doing somersaults down here when the war is starting. we will not disgrace our country. launch a nuclear torpedo. they set it ready to launch. fortunately one of the other commanders on the ship who had a
will introduce susan and mickey edwards. it's a great honor to be your colleague. >> thank you so much. susan and mickey, i really appreciate your coming and all of you for participating in this event. norm and i have been friends and colleagues and collaborators for over 40 years. i know it shows on me. it doesn't show on him, but people often ask me when we collaborate, with the division of labor? finally i got a book cover that pretty much lays it out. i mean, you see the subtitle, how the constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism. on the left is your constitution beige. a slightly worn. on the right is the harsh color inside extremism. orenstein is that the politics of extremists. just so you have this straight. i also want to announce this will be her last public appearance before entering the witness protection program. [laughter] i mean, maybe we should have followed the full script of hans christian andersen and enlisted a child to blurt out, the emperor wears no clothes, but we weren't smart enough to do that. actually what i want to say is the response to the
and then i'll introduce susanne and mickey edwards. >> is a great honor to be your colleague. >> jay, thank you so much. suzanne and mickey, i appreciate your coming and all of you for participating in this event. norm and i have been friends and colleagues and collaborators for over 40 years. i know it shows on me. it doesn't show one had. .. before entering the witness protection program. [laughter] >> mabey we should have followed the full script of christian andersen and enlisted a child for the emperor wears clothes, but we were not smart enough to do that. actually, what i want to say is the response to the first ten days or less of commentary i've learned what it means to go viral. it was a very instructive lesson. but it's been very heartening. maybe 5% have ugly hate mail and another 5% constructive criticism and 90% thank you for saying this. and a prominent among the scores of people who e-mail thus and were in the 90% of the self identified republicans, ordinary citizens and some elected officials and party activists as well and a fair number of reporters both of whom take a lit
you a brief recap of all three of them. and, of course, marvin kalb, who is the edward r. murrow professor emeritus at harvard kennedy school of government. and a contributing news analyst for npr and fox news channel. antaeus wrigley called upon to comment on major issues of the day by many other leading news organizations. and also he is very dear to our heart here at aspen because he is legally serve as moderator, and done a superb job each time. very happy to have you back, martin. thank you so much. let me just go back and say just a word about the in depth knowledge, skill, dedication and perseverance of each of you present today who worked on the negotiating team for the process that led up to it. really did not just bring this to fruition but also reflect the practice of diplomacy at its best. it required outstanding diplomacy and -- to balance the risks and demands of peace in the sort of opec security environment of the cold war period, which perhaps, perhaps most people to remember but perhaps some do not. so, before turning the program over to marvin though, i would j
edward little high school in auburn, maine, and subsequently attended the university of maine where in 1969 she earned a degree in political science. it was also in college that she met peter snowe. peter shared olympia's passion for politics. they married shortly after graduation, and in 1972, peter was elected to the state legislature while olympia went to work as a legislative staffer for maine congressman bill coen. now, the young couple seemed well on their way to building a life together, but in 1973, in the midst of a winter snowstorm, tragedy struck. peter was killed in a car crash. at a still young age, so limb yeah was left to build a life for herself. what could have marked the end of her political aspirations became a new beginning instead. as olympia once put it, she resolved to make a positive out of a terrible negative. she ran for office in the special election held to fill her late husband's seat and won. it was the start of a long and distinguished career in public service. olympia was subsequently re-elected to the maine house in 1974 and elected to the maine sena
can have the opposite effect. nobel economist edward press scott of arizona has found that higher marginal tax rates are the reason europeans work one-third fewer hours than americans. when marginal rates are lower, prosperity flows to other sectors of society, allowing business to create jobs and new products, compete for workers to raise wages and i vest their profits, which can then be lent to other entrepreneurs. everyone gains in a free economy. as john f. kennedy put it, a rising tide lifts all boats. look at what free enpricent pris achieved? millions of new private-sector jobs were created and the stock market soared tripling in value over eight years. the lower tax rates and reduced regulatory burden produce add more robust economy and a more robust economy meant more revenue for government. similar resulted attended the tax rate reductions during the presidency of george w. bush. many policy-makers have forgotten these lessons. in 2008, america's score in the index of economic freedom has declined significantly -- i mean, since 2008, to the point where we are no longer c
. that's followed by more on president obama with edward klein who wrote "the amateur" about the president's life and career before reaching the white house. and later the white house videographer for the first two years of the obama presidency. >> you don't always find many newspaper editors of any era embracing investigative reporting. the point we've seen over the years it's not just economics, it's the discomfort that investigative reporting often causes in a newsroom. because it's troublesome. it's that more than the economics. i mean, if you're going to ruffle the feathers of somebody powerful, that gets those people running in to complain to the publisher, and there are stories that are legion over years about those kinds of things happening. don and i were fortunate through really almost all our career or to work for people who were really strong and upright in that area and just let the chips fall where they may. >> the investigative team of donald bar let and james steele will take your calls, e-mails and tweets next month on "in depth." the pair are the co-authors
's one. why don't we start right there? >> thank you. my name is edward joseph, i'm with the johns hopkins. great to be here today. great discussion but, in fact, i'd like to invoke further on the comment that shadi made about the legitimacy of the document. we were talking at a referendum on the constitution. the constitution is the foundation for egypt's democracy. and if i could, shadi, ascii and khaled, to probe further, assuming of course this will pass which it is very likely to happen. do you believe that fundamentally egyptians across the spectrum will accept this constitution as legitimate? even if they decide to participate in parliamentary elections, which shadi raise, they would not do even if they decided. will they look, yes, this is our constitution. i may not like it, but i accept. just around the question now, is there a sense at all among liberals that, hey, we were the ones fighting this revolution. you guys were johnny-come-lately. we were the ones who were there from the beginning and since it's our revolution, -- [inaudible] >> thank you. there are a couple of
army. gunnery sergeant justin edward malti united states marine corps, pittsburgh. master sergeant benjamin franklin bitner, united states army green castle. first lieutenant demet r*u s, lancaster. staff sergeant david edward mills injury, united states army, new castle. sergeant joseph michael garrison, united states marine corps, new bethel. staff sergeant patrick ryan dulfa, united states marine corps, moscow. sergeant christopher matthew wrinkle, united states marine dallas town. petty officer michael joseph strange, united states navy, philadelphia. technical sergeant daniel lee sur, united states air force, york. staff sergeant eric scott holmen, united states army, everyone city. lieutenant colonel christopher keith rabel, united states marine corps, north huntington. chief petty officer, nicholas david czech, u.s. navy, monroeville. commander job w. price, u.s. navy, potts town. major wesley james hinckley, united states army, cumberland city. i yield back to the senior senator. mr. casey: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senior senator from pennsylvania. mr. case
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